Should off sides on kickoffs be blown dead?

mustangscoach

New member
Last week at a playoff game I saw an interesting play. The kicking team was doing an on-side kick. One of the players was clearly off sides. (2-3 yards) With this advantage he was able to get past the blocker and level the other teams reciever as he was going up to retrieve the ball. It was a big hit, but not a dirty hit. The ref then through a flag for unsportsmanlike conduct. A young man behind me said out loud, "That's why you should blow it dead when someone is off sides." It seems to me that the kicking team can really get a free shot at the opposing teams best players just by giving up 5 yards of field position.(for the off sides) I know that nearly all coaches would not condone this, but what rules are there to protect the recieving player. Should off sides on kickoffs be blown dead?
 

JasonTX

Member
Offside on the kick is a live ball foul. The play is not blown dead. Other than the normal rules for personal fouls and kick catch interference that is pretty much all the "protection" there is, but even if a foul is called, it still don't "protect" them from injury. The receiving team is the only real protection there is.
 

kbjoe1

Member
if the kicking team gets past the kicked ball can they block the receiving team from coming forward and catching the ball... assume the ball is bouncing and no fair catch is signaled for?

is it fair to hit anyone on a kick off at any time from the from the front above the waiste?
 

route66

Member
I think sixman should have a rule like 11 man that makes you divide up players equally on each side of the ball. I know the on-side is a big part of sixman, but when people come out of a bunch or an overload, I think it is too big an advantage for the kicking team. The return team has to respect that they might kick to any part of the field, so they have to spread out. This leaves one player to protect a receiver. At times there are 5 players coming at the receiver. I think this is a safety issue. I know this is the way it has always been, but we took helmet to helmet out of the game for safety. The worst injuries I saw this year were on onsides.
 

JasonTX

Member
kbjoe1":3rtpymtj said:
if the kicking team gets past the kicked ball can they block the receiving team from coming forward and catching the ball... assume the ball is bouncing and no fair catch is signaled for?

is it fair to hit anyone on a kick off at any time from the from the front above the waiste?

No. Not until the kicking team is eligible to touch the ball. That would be after it has been touched by the receiving team or it has traveled 15 yards. If the receiving team initiates contact then it is not a foul by either player if the block itself is legal.
 

kbjoe1

Member
i do not think that the play should be whistled dead nor do i think that the kicking team should be required to line up in any way
coaches and teams are learning that this is an important part of the game both on the kicking end and receiving end. the tactics can change the game. the blocking on an onside can be devistating as well if practiced. the kicking team has to put the fastist people out there to attack and also take the risk of them getting their bell rung if blocked correctly
it all comes down to proper training practice practice practice,,, you cant teach speed but you can counter act it
my 2 cents
 

mustangscoach

New member
I remember when some teams used to actually kick off deep every once in awhile. Then it got to where everyone kicked on sides to keep the ball out of the hands of the fastest players from the other team. Now it seems a lot of teams kick on sides just to get a shot in on the other team. That is fine. It is part of the game, but when you get a head start with the off sides it's an unnecessary safety issue in my opinion.
 

ZeroRisk

Member
I really don't think a kicking team player getting a step or two offside on a kick is much of a safety issue or a major advantage in putting a big hit on a Team B player. Team B players are standing upright and facing the oncoming player, so this isn't a situation where they are unprepared and do not know that the hit it coming.

On kickoffs, the kicking team players get a head start to get to full speed by the time that they reach the restraining line and the ball is kicked. It's a penalty if they are offside, but whether they are a step over at the time the ball is kicked or not doesn't really change their ability to hit a player for the receiving team.

Also, I saw a large number of deep kicks in the 6-man games I worked this season.
 
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